The Garden View: Hardy trees and shrubs

<p>Sun-Times Media file photo</p>

Sun-Times Media file photo

Just in time for spring, our gardening column is back! “The Garden View” takes a look at all aspects of working in the mud. Today, some trees and shrub to consider planting.

If you’re lucky enough to be planning a garden from a blank canvas this year, you probably would like to start with some tried and true hardy plants, shrubs and trees.

Native plants are always a good place to start. Not only are they used to your region, they provide food for native birds and butterflies. Seasonal color can easily be added by using hardy annuals. Foliage plants can add interest and can be heat and drought tolerant.

This article will offer specific recommendations for hardy shrubs and trees. In addition to the traditional varieties long used in Midwest gardens, many new varieties have been introduced.

Birds and Blooms magazine suggests the following shrubs and trees for various conditions:

Shade

Annabelle or smooth hydrangea

Viburnum

Witch Hazel

Boxwood Yew

Sun

Ninebark

Spireas

Landscape or shrub roses

Smoke bush

Juniper

Wet Areas

Redtwig dogwood

Chokeberry

Elderberry

Winterberry

Dappled willow

Trees for shade

Dogwoods

Fringetree

Serviceberry

Musclewood or hornbeam

Ironwood or hop hornbeam

Trees for wet areas

Sweet bay magnolia

Red maple

Bald cypress

Swamp white oak

Trees for sun

Crabapples

Hawthorns

Hackberry

Oaks

Ginkgo

This content was submitted by a member of the community. We’d like to hear from you, too! To share stories, photos, video or events for our calendar, please email Community News Manager Michael Cronin at michael.cronin@wrapports.com or use the online submission tool.

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