Evanston clinic takes proactive approach to reduce arm injuries

<div id=

Dr. Terrance Sgroi of Accelerated Rehabilitation Centers analyzes video of a pitcher by using software designed to allow him to review the throwing motion from 20 specific points and compare it to accepted normal pitching mechanics. | Submitted photo

" class="article-img" />

Dr. Terrance Sgroi of Accelerated Rehabilitation Centers analyzes video of a pitcher by using software designed to allow him to review the throwing motion from 20 specific points and compare it to accepted normal pitching mechanics. | Submitted photo

One day during the winter, as the Evanston baseball team practiced inside the school’s field house in preparation for the 2014 season, several cameras were set up in a section of the gymnasium.

Most of the Wildkits were engaged in normal running and fielding drills. But for 15 of the team’s pitchers — ranging from freshmen to seniors — the throwing portion of the workout was anything but typical.

A camera crew from Accelerated Rehabilitation Centers in Evanston — brought in by Evanston athletic director Chris Livatino — filmed the Wildkits’ pitchers as part of an innovative program that uses high-speed digital technology in an effort to prevent the occurrence of throwing injuries related to poor mechanics and overuse.

“They looked at each kid on video,” Wildkits coach Frank Consiglio said. “The delivery and arm angle and elbows and shoulders. They were pretty efficient.”

Using cameras that capture images at 500 frames per second, athletes in Accelerated Rehab’s Overhead Throwing Program are filmed from several angles while throwing.

[For full story continue to High School Cube News]

0 Comments

Do you have the scariest house on the block? Or the cutest kid in costume? Share your Halloween photos with us! Click here to submit them.


Modal