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The race is on for Dillard's State Senate seat

Republican state Sen. Kirk Dillard officially announces his run for Illinois governor in 2014 outside his childhood home in Chicago, Monday, July 15, 2013. Dillard lost the 2010 GOP primary to state Sen. Bill Brady.   (AP Photo/Scott Eisen)  ORG XMIT: CST1307151305060138
Published: Dennis Reboletti Original: No Original Caption
Chris Nybo
Patti Bellock

HINSDALE, Ill. — Current and former state representatives are expressing interest in running for the 24th District State Senate seat that will be vacant in 2014.

The seat will be open because incumbent Republican Sen. Kirk Dillard of Hinsdale is running for governor.

Dennis Reboletti, R-45th, of Elmhurst, said Friday he is “extremely interested” in the state Senate seat.

“I’ve had conversations with Sen. Dillard and anticipate making an announcement in the next few weeks,” Reboletti said.

Chris Nybo, who ran unsuccessfully against Kirk Dillard in 2012, is considering another run.

“I’m taking it under consideration, but there’s a long time before the election,” Nybo said Friday. “I’m always interested in public service, and I’ve been getting a lot of calls from people, telling me I should run again.”

Nybo, also of Elmhurst, served as a state representative in the 41st District from 2010 to 2012.

Dillard ran for governor in 2010, and finished a closed second in the GOP Primary. But he wasn’t up for re-election in the Senate that year. This time both his Senate seat and the governor’s office are up the same year, and under state law he cannot run for both. The primary will be held in March 2014, meaning the filing deadline will likely be this November — just four months away.

State Rep. Patti Bellock, R-47th of Hinsdale, is also reported to be interested, but could not be reached Friday for comment. Her House district includes half of the Senate district, which includes all or part of Oak Brook, Hinsdale, Clarendon Hills, Western Springs and other towns.

Nybo said he’s known for a while the opportunity might be coming to once again run for in the 24th District.

“I’ve already had 40 percent of the people in the district vote for me, so I start off with that support,” he said. “If I were to go back, my desire to get things done in Springfield wouldn’t be diminished. My top priority before was pension reform, and that’s still unresolved.”

Dillard said he wouldn’t be surprised to see several candidates seeking the seat.

“There’s not a shortage of very fine potential candidates,” he said. “I want someone who is a tireless representative for the taxpayers and an advocate to the suburbs to replace me.”~.

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